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HOW DO I KNOW IF I’M HIGH RISK, AND WHAT DO I DO NEXT?

Contact the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center:

1-877-332-6585

The information on this page can help you decide if you or a loved one may qualify for monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment and, if you do qualify, how you can get mAb treatment.

People aged 12 or older may be considered at high risk for developing more serious symptoms—making them eligible for mAb treatment—depending on their health history and how long they’ve had symptoms of COVID-19.

DID YOU KNOW...?

You or your loved one may be eligible for mAb treatment if you meet the following criteria:

  • Are an adult or pediatric (≥ 12 years of age and weighing at least ≤ 40 kg) patient
  • Have tested positive for COVID-19
  • Are experiencing mild or moderate symptoms of COVID-19
  • Experienced your first symptoms of COVID-19 in the last 10 days
  • Are at high risk for having more serious symptoms of COVID-19 and/or going into the hospital


 
People can be at high risk because of many reasons including their age, having an underlying medical condition, and other things. Some of the most common reasons are listed below:

  • Age ≥ 65 years
  • Obesity or being overweight based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clinical growth charts
  • Pregnancy
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Immunosuppressive disease or immunosuppressive treatment
  • Heart or circulatory conditions such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, and possibly high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Chronic lung diseases including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate to severe), interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders such as cerebral palsy
  • Having a medical device (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation [not related to COVID-19])

For more detail on the eligibility criteria for the authorized treatments, see the Fact Sheets on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website. To speak with someone about monoclonal antibodies call 1-877-332-6585.

mAb Risk Factors

If you are high risk, talk to your healthcare provider about mAb treatment.

Find an Infusion Location

If you don’t qualify for mAb treatment, you still have options. There are clinical trials for people like you.

Join a Treatment Clinical Trial

Positive for COVID-19, but don’t have a healthcare provider? Call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585.


WHAT ARE THE TREATMENTS?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has authorized two monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments for emergency use: etesevimab and bamlanivimab or casirivimab and imdevimab. These treatments could help your immune system respond more effectively to the virus that causes COVID-19, reducing the chances that your symptoms will get worse. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you're eligible for mAb treatment.

Monoclonal antibody treatment
Woman wearing a mask driving a car

I’M AT HIGH RISK. HOW CAN I GET MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY TREATMENT?

If you qualify for mAb treatment, there are three steps to get it:

  1. Test positive for COVID-19 sometime in the last 10 days.
  2. Get a referral for mAb treatment from your healthcare provider. If you do not have a healthcare provider, call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585 to find out who to talk with about your risk and treatment.
  3. Locate an infusion center that’s available near you.

    Find an Infusion Location